4 Top Strategies for Finding Your Dream Job by Phyllis

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Originally Publish Date: March 16, 2017 https://www.aorn.org/aorn-org/surgicalexpo/conference-blog/find-your-periop-dream-job

 

I want to share some career coaching guidance with you:

1. Build a Strong Resume that Reflects Your Worth

Ensure your full name with credentials appears at the top in the header along with your contact information. The correct formatting is, name (middle initial optional), highest academic credential, RN, certification. For example, Mary A. Smith, MSN, RN, CNOR. A summary or statement of intent is no longer advised.

Your first section should be Academic Education. Start with your highest degree. If you’re still in school, it’s acceptable to note the date you started and an anticipated date of graduation. Next list your Professional Experience, Certifications & Memberships and Continuing Education & Computer Skills. End with Honors/Awards & Achievements.

If you find a job posting on the AORN Career Center site or other site, read it carefully and make sure that important phrases contained in that job posting language are also contained somewhere in your resume. This will increase the likelihood that the computer will recognize the language and select your resume, over others, for the recruiter to read.

2. Develop an Elevator Pitch

Once your resume is pulled, it is likely that you’ll get a screening call from a recruiter. This could be a make or break conversation. A successful screening conversation is the gateway to an actual interview. When the recruiter asks, “why did you apply for this position?” or “tell me about yourself?” you must be ready to share a ninety-second clear, passionate, and compelling answer that communicates you’re a serious candidate.

Take your time to form the exact four to five sentences that make your point. It may take an hour’s worth of revisions to get this just right but the return on your investment could be huge. You want to sound prepared but not rehearsed in your delivery. You may use your elevator pitch more frequently than expected. It’s always professional and polished to have it ready when networking and speaking with colleagues or vendors.

3. Invest in Your Own Resilience

Nurses downplay the need to take care of themselves so they can take care of others. Caring comes so naturally that we often forget that we cannot render quality, safe care when we’re physically tired or energetically depleted. Ensuring that we take good care of ourselves is actually quite generous. Building resilience allows us to stay fresh and available so we can deliver a consistent caring product every day.

Here are two suggestions for keeping your resilience well full. Incorporate some silent, still time into your life. Nurses are professional doers and always on the go. That may mean you take a walk and just experience the outdoors. It could mean that you discover meditation or yoga. There’s peace in stillness and we can all use a break from the endless noise of our thoughts.

Allow yourself to be cared for by others. Nurses are always giving and the only way to balance that is to allow yourself to receive. Lose the need for control and perfection by finding a way to delegate more at work and at home. Resist the urge to host every holiday and enjoy being a guest. Both of these practices will be hard at first but stick with it and notice the change in your energy level and yourself.

It’s been my honor to be the career coach for AORN since 2012. Each year at the conference, I have the opportunity to meet some AORN members for the first time and reconnect with members from past events. The most common question I’ve been asked over the years is, “so what is coaching all about?” This brings me to my final piece of career advice – career and personal coaching.

4. Consider Career and Personal Coaching

Career coaching is a great way to get individualized guidance and assistance with establishing your professional goals, making career choices, creating an academic roadmap, polishing interview techniques, and becoming skilled in marketing yourself. It often involves reviewing and revising resumes and learning how to increase your chances of getting your resume into the right hands once it’s uploaded to an organization’s career page. Sharpening your social media skills on sites such as LinkedIn is often useful as well.

Personal coaching is the process of supporting personal growth in a nonjudgmental manner. It can be challenging to remain clear and authentic about your goals and yourself as you try to navigate your life. Responsibilities, set-backs, and the demands of an adult life can overshadow your understanding of the present and cloud your vision for the future. Our human nature creates blind spots to options and solutions. Coaching provides vital support as one explores behaviors and attitudes that can short-circuit success in life and career.

THANK YOU SeeSee. Florence “SeeSee” Rigney, RN is the oldest working nurse…!

 

Florence “SeeSee” Rigney is the oldest working nurse in the United States. Last May, a video of her 90th birthday celebration went viral. The recording captures her in blue scrubs and a bedazzled “happy birthday” tiara holding back tears among her cheering colleagues. For 70 years she’s worked on and off as an operating room nurse at Tacoma General Hospital. When she first started, she got paid $115 a month. These days, she gets a ton of attention for being a high-energy compassionate nurse who still moves down the halls of the surgical unit faster than women a third her age. In 2015, Rigney was on The Dr. Oz Show and nominated for a March of Dimes Nurse of the Year award. Her birthday video was shared by The Huffington Post, The Today Show and BuzzFeed. She admits she feels a bit like a local celebrity even though she’s bashful about all the publicity. “I feel very honored to think that all of this has happened to me just because I turned 90, and I’m still here!”

Talks with Greg; Conversations In Caregiving – Sheila Warnock

 

For more than fifteen years, EmblemHealth has been a leader in the arena of family caregiving. Talks with Greg; Conversations In Caregiving is a video series designed to explore topics with experts involved for many years in caregiving. Every episode will have a new guest from a different facet of the professional caregiving world who has been a longtime partner with EmblemHealth.

OUR FOCUS IS EDUCATION

Caregiving will touch everyone at some point in life yet it often remains in the shadows of the public/media spotlight because it does not make for a picture that melts the heart but rather one to be avoided at all costs. Not so much because people are uncaring but rather frightened and uneducated.

Sometimes, friends disappear when illness strikes because they don’t know “what to do or what to say.”

And often the person needing support and their caregiver hide the fact and carry the entire burden alone rather than admit they could use help.

STC’s focus is on educating caregivers, patients and their concerned friends, neighbors, co-workers and acquaintances about the profound personal benefits to everyone involved through sharing the care.

Because we find that family caregivers often tend to be isolated and therefore less likely to reach out for help, we target professionals, and faith communities. They see caregivers and patients on a daily basis and are best situated to identify those who could benefit from a STC group. We also seek to reach working caregivers through corporations.

https://sharethecare.org/

Tel: 212 991-9688

HerVoiceIsMyVoice: Celebrate the Women Who Inspire Us Every Day

The strength of individual women empowers us all. This International Women’s Day, we’re turning up the volume on female voices and honoring the impact they have on all of us. #HerVoiceIsMyVoice is a moment to celebrate and share the voices of inspirational women from around the world.

Show your support on social by sharing the voice of a woman who has inspired you using #HerVoiceIsMyVoice.

How to Escort Seniors to the Voting Polls A Guest Post By : A Place for Mom Staff

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Originally Posted in the Senior Living Blog: Posted On 24 Oct 2016

The United States has a proud democratic tradition dating back more than 200 years, and that tradition is based on the right to vote. Unfortunately, many older people who are receiving care at senior living communities aren’t always able exercise that right.

Seniors may be intimidated by the thought of getting to the polls and potentially waiting in long lines. Some might even wonder whether, as long term care residents, they’re still allowed to vote. Learn more about how to escort seniors to the polls during this election.

Escorting Senior Loved Ones to the Voting Polls

On Tuesday, November 8, 2016, U.S. citizens will vote and determine the direction of our country.

This year, senior advocacy organizations are making sure senior living residents’ voices are heard and votes are counted:

  • The Senior Citizens League put together a checklist to follow to ensure seniors are informed and ready to vote, which includes:
    • Knowing your district, registration and voting method, to researching candidates and issues, and finally, making your voice heard.
  • Worldwide Programs for the Elderly promotes escorting seniors to the voting polls through a program, which provides escort and transportation to ensure that age and mobility does not limit a senior’s right to vote.
  • Voting by absentee ballot is another way for seniors to make their voice heard if they are unable to go to their local polling place on Election Day. Be sure to research the set of rules regarding the specific requirements and qualifications for absentee voting in your state.

How Senior Living Providers Can Help Residents Vote

Senior living and other long-term care providers can help residents vote, by:

  1. Distributing sample ballots to familiarize residents with voting procedures.
  2. Helping residents get absentee ballots to vote.
  3. Helping residents register to vote.
  4. Hosting debate watching events.
  5. Hosting political discussions.
  6. Posting reminders about registration deadlines.
  7. Providing information on upcoming candidates and elections.
  8. Provide transportation to the polls.

We applaud these efforts and believe it’s vitally important that every citizen have the opportunity to make their voice heard.

If you are concerned that a senior loved one who lives in senior living may not be able to exercise their constitutional right to vote, contact your local Long-term Care Ombudsman for assistance.

For more information about polling locations and other election related matters where you live, visit the USA.gov Voting webpage.

Do you have experience escorting senior loved ones to the voting polls? Do you have any tips that you’d like to share? We’d love to hear your stories in the comments below.

Related Articles:

Highlights from the 2016 OR Today Magazine Convention’s Key Note Presentation: An Interview with Phyllis

Original Article Featured in OR Today Magazine, November 2016 Edition

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Do you believe that workplace bullying and incivility are the same?

No. Workplace incivility can best be defined as low-intensity unpleasant behavior that is rude, impolite, or inconsiderate. While the target can feel insulted or angry; an actual desire or intent to harm the other person is ambiguous. Anyone has the potential to behave inappropriately towards a coworker given the right circumstances coupled with a lack of self-management.

Workplace bullying however, is ongoing, offensive, abusive, intimidating or insulting behavior or actions directed at a person(s), causing the target to feel threatened, abused, humiliated or vulnerable. The person experiencing prolonged bullying can feel a range of psychological and physiological symptoms. The research supports that, those who bully, are very aware of their behavior and its effect on the others; even though they may deny that there is intent. Fortunately, there is only a very small percentage of the workforce that is capable of such sustained disregard for another individual.

So these behaviors are very different. Should the management be different as well?  

Yes, they should and I want to be clear as to why. The two keys here are insight and sustainability. The person who behaves in an uncivil manner has the ability to self-reflect on that indiscretion, feel remorse or regret and make the active choice to work on their self-management skills and achieve personal growth. A bully does not have this ability.

It is vital that we understand and accept that a nurse bully is a narcissist with a license. A narcissist lacks the capacity for empathy. The ability to reflect empathically on the consequence that one’s poor behavior has on another is vital for driving the desire to change. Bullies (narcissists) are incapable of this.

An uncivil staff member can gain insight though coaching and training. Positive, sustained changes in behavior can be noted within six to twelve weeks of working a clear emotional intelligence improvement action plan. A narcissist typically reacts in one of two ways to someone attempting to hold them accountable. They may escalate their behavior and retaliate or they will tell you what you want to hear and vow to reform. However, they cannot sustain any improvement because they lack a connection with the need to improve.

So why is managing bullying behavior in nursing so challenging?

This is a complex issue but one reason is that nurses are professional caregivers. Nursing leaders have a good deal of difficulty coming to terms with the fact that a bully/narcissist cannot be fixed. It is not a part of our caregiver DNA to “give-up” on someone. We talk ourselves into believing that if we just try a little harder that this individual will have an epiphany and the problem will be resolved.

The bully/narcissist is hoping that you will react exactly in this manner. They are experts at taking your wonderful qualities of empathy, patience and the need to heal and use them against you to achieve their goal of never being held accountable to sustained improvement. Essentially, we need to get out of our own way in order to take charge of this situation. Nurse leaders must try to accept that once someone shows you their true colors, you need to resist repainting them.

The only performance improvement plan for a bully/narcissist is a collaborative effort put forth by administration, human resources and the nurse leader that is time sensitive and rich with mandatory training. The documentation should discuss the need for improvement to be demonstrated within three to six months then sustained for six months as well.

Most bully/narcissists will not be able to withstand this type of scrutiny and may decide to move on. The others may stay but will find it very challenging to sustain the improvement. Should termination be the only option left, you can have the peace of mind that a sincere effort was made on your part; and twelve months’ worth of documentation to support your action.

 

 

Share The Care Organization wants to make you aware of a special opportunity from Road Scholar

Share The Care

STC wants to make you aware of a special opportunity from Road Scholar
Road Scholar
The Road Scholar Caregiver Grant has a rolling admission – and asks that applications be submitted at least 4-6 weeks before the start of the program. For example, for a program starting on December 8, 2016, it would be ideal to have the application in by November 4th. At this time, we have almost 770 US-based programs open for enrollment all the way through December of 2017, so there’s a lot to chose from.
Who is Road Scholar? 
Not-for-profit Road Scholar is the world’s largest and most innovative creator of educational travel adventures. Our mission is to inspire adults to learn, discover and travel. 
What is a Road Scholar Caregiver Grant? 
The Road Scholar Caregiver Grant is a unique respite opportunity for unpaid family caregivers to take part in a Road Scholar educational travel program. The grant is for Caregivers who are 50 years of age or older and provides an award of up to $1,300 to use toward a U.S.-based educational adventure that costs no more than $1,400. 
Who is eligible for a Caregiver Grant? 
A caregiver is eligible for a grant if … 
  • Their loved one is receiving home care, hospice, visiting nurse, LPN services, or comparable and related services. 
  • Their loved one is in adult day care, memory care, a nursing home or comparable or related facility.
  • They lost a loved one within the past two years who was in any of the above situations.
  • They live in the United States and are 50 years of age and older.
Why seek respite on a Road Scholar program? 
Participating in a Road Scholar program is a special experience of learning and community. Road Scholar programs are a wonderful way to feel revitalized, to make new friends and to spark creativity and intellectual curiosity. This unique Road Scholar experience could be especially helpful for caregivers who are experiencing isolation and feelings of depression, stress and anxiety. 
How does it work? 
The Caregiver Grant is an award of up to $1,300 applied to the cost of a U.S.-based Road Scholar learning adventure that costs no more than $1,400. Grant recipients are responsible for their round-trip transportation to and from the program. Road Scholar takes care of everything else: lodging, meals, field trips, transportation during the program and much more – it’s all included.
Learn more about Road Scholar Caregiver Grants 
For more information or to download an application, visitwww.roadscholar.org/caregivergrant. To request brochures to share about Road Scholar Caregiver Grants, please call 617-457-5429 or email scholarships@roadscholar.org.
Care to Share? Share The Care: http://sharethecare.org/ 
We would love to hear your caregiving stories, see your videos, share your pictures or advice on our website. Your stories and thoughts will help others that find themselves on the  paths that you have traveled.
View some of your stories here.
View some of your photos here.
View some of your advice here.
Contact us  here or by email

Meet Super Nurse Who Dresses the Part to Put a Smile on Sick Children’s Faces

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http://www.nbcnews.com/nightly-news/video/meet-superhero-nurse-who-dresses-part-to-put-smiles-on-patients-faces-767183427954

“Super Nurse” Tobin Matthew has played all sorts of good guys at his Chicago hospital over the years, including hanging upside down as Spiderman – anything to put a smile on a sick child’s face.