4 Top Strategies for Finding Your Dream Job by Phyllis

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Originally Publish Date: March 16, 2017 https://www.aorn.org/aorn-org/surgicalexpo/conference-blog/find-your-periop-dream-job

 

I want to share some career coaching guidance with you:

1. Build a Strong Resume that Reflects Your Worth

Ensure your full name with credentials appears at the top in the header along with your contact information. The correct formatting is, name (middle initial optional), highest academic credential, RN, certification. For example, Mary A. Smith, MSN, RN, CNOR. A summary or statement of intent is no longer advised.

Your first section should be Academic Education. Start with your highest degree. If you’re still in school, it’s acceptable to note the date you started and an anticipated date of graduation. Next list your Professional Experience, Certifications & Memberships and Continuing Education & Computer Skills. End with Honors/Awards & Achievements.

If you find a job posting on the AORN Career Center site or other site, read it carefully and make sure that important phrases contained in that job posting language are also contained somewhere in your resume. This will increase the likelihood that the computer will recognize the language and select your resume, over others, for the recruiter to read.

2. Develop an Elevator Pitch

Once your resume is pulled, it is likely that you’ll get a screening call from a recruiter. This could be a make or break conversation. A successful screening conversation is the gateway to an actual interview. When the recruiter asks, “why did you apply for this position?” or “tell me about yourself?” you must be ready to share a ninety-second clear, passionate, and compelling answer that communicates you’re a serious candidate.

Take your time to form the exact four to five sentences that make your point. It may take an hour’s worth of revisions to get this just right but the return on your investment could be huge. You want to sound prepared but not rehearsed in your delivery. You may use your elevator pitch more frequently than expected. It’s always professional and polished to have it ready when networking and speaking with colleagues or vendors.

3. Invest in Your Own Resilience

Nurses downplay the need to take care of themselves so they can take care of others. Caring comes so naturally that we often forget that we cannot render quality, safe care when we’re physically tired or energetically depleted. Ensuring that we take good care of ourselves is actually quite generous. Building resilience allows us to stay fresh and available so we can deliver a consistent caring product every day.

Here are two suggestions for keeping your resilience well full. Incorporate some silent, still time into your life. Nurses are professional doers and always on the go. That may mean you take a walk and just experience the outdoors. It could mean that you discover meditation or yoga. There’s peace in stillness and we can all use a break from the endless noise of our thoughts.

Allow yourself to be cared for by others. Nurses are always giving and the only way to balance that is to allow yourself to receive. Lose the need for control and perfection by finding a way to delegate more at work and at home. Resist the urge to host every holiday and enjoy being a guest. Both of these practices will be hard at first but stick with it and notice the change in your energy level and yourself.

It’s been my honor to be the career coach for AORN since 2012. Each year at the conference, I have the opportunity to meet some AORN members for the first time and reconnect with members from past events. The most common question I’ve been asked over the years is, “so what is coaching all about?” This brings me to my final piece of career advice – career and personal coaching.

4. Consider Career and Personal Coaching

Career coaching is a great way to get individualized guidance and assistance with establishing your professional goals, making career choices, creating an academic roadmap, polishing interview techniques, and becoming skilled in marketing yourself. It often involves reviewing and revising resumes and learning how to increase your chances of getting your resume into the right hands once it’s uploaded to an organization’s career page. Sharpening your social media skills on sites such as LinkedIn is often useful as well.

Personal coaching is the process of supporting personal growth in a nonjudgmental manner. It can be challenging to remain clear and authentic about your goals and yourself as you try to navigate your life. Responsibilities, set-backs, and the demands of an adult life can overshadow your understanding of the present and cloud your vision for the future. Our human nature creates blind spots to options and solutions. Coaching provides vital support as one explores behaviors and attitudes that can short-circuit success in life and career.

HerVoiceIsMyVoice: Celebrate the Women Who Inspire Us Every Day

The strength of individual women empowers us all. This International Women’s Day, we’re turning up the volume on female voices and honoring the impact they have on all of us. #HerVoiceIsMyVoice is a moment to celebrate and share the voices of inspirational women from around the world.

Show your support on social by sharing the voice of a woman who has inspired you using #HerVoiceIsMyVoice.

Commencement Remarks to the Touro College School of Health Science 2016 Graduates offered by Phyllis on September 13, 2016.

Graduates in Cap and Gown
Graduates in Cap and Gown — Image by © Royalty-Free/Corbis

 

Dean Primavera, distinguished faculty, honored guests, proud parents and family and my newly graduated colleagues…

I want to begin my guidance to you this afternoon by reminding all of you of just how unique and wonderful you all are. You see many people care capable to feel empathy for someone given the right circumstances. It is the rare few that cannot feel something when the news is filled with stories of the survivors of an earthquake or a picture of a five year old stunned by the events of war.

But it is the rare soul that can mobilize their empathy and compassionate nature into the action we call caregiving; and even fewer that take it on as their life’s work. Serving your fellow man, woman or child is the highest form of generosity I know and you have all chosen this Path.

So I would like to offer you three steps to take to ensure that you stay connected to the beautiful mission that you have accepted:

First: Create a place for stillness in your daily life.

                Professional caregivers are perpetual doers. The only way to balance continuous doing is to stop and be still. The goal of stillness is to free you from the endless loop of thoughts in your head and encourage you to be more in your body. Simple exercises such as mindful-breathing can offer you an opportunity to pause and rest in a peaceful place. The answer to many of the questions that you will be asking yourself over the next twenty-five years lie in that wonderful silent, still place. Find the simple things in life that can offer you a momentary rest from the noise in your head.

Second: Allow others to care for you.

                Suggesting to a professional caregiver that they may need to be cared for is often offensive to them. Caregivers see themselves as strong, indispensable and indestructible. When I suggest that someone may need caring for, it is often thought that I am suggesting that they are weak or even damaged. Self-care is an act of generosity not selfishness. Self-care allows you to stay available to serve. Taking good care of yourself keeps you connected to your compassionate nature longer and in a more authentic manner.

I often hear professional caregivers explain to me how they take care of themselves and indeed, that is the issue and my point. Taking care of yourself does not let you receive care. Allowing yourself to receive is vital. It is in the receiving of care from another, either through friendship, love, massage, reiki, or delegation of responsibility, that our spirits are renewed, reconnected and refreshed.

Finally: Develop you emotional intelligence.

We are at a time in our industry and professions where knowledge and skills are not enough. Gone are the days of accepting that someone is great at what they do but no one can stand to work with them. The days condoning of ego-dominated behaviors are numbered.

Emotional intelligence has not been stressed in healthcare largely due to the fact that we have been trying to figure out a way to survive.  We have been trying to find a model of care and understand how we are going to pay for that model since 1984 with the break from the fee-for-service structure. We are now fairly clear on a model of care and how it will be financed. It is time to turn our attention to mastering the four skills of emotional intelligence: self-awareness, self-management, social-awareness and relationship-management. We need to master these behavioral expectations in the same manner that our non-healthcare professional colleagues are held accountable to do.

Solid emotional intelligence skills are tools for reducing the risk of compassion fatigue and reducing the prevalence of bullying and incivility in our professions. If we do not redirect our attention to these essential “soft-skills”, we will have no chance of creating a true, interdisciplinary model of care that is patient-centered and humane. We will continue to lose the best of us to venues of practice other than the bedside where we need the best most.

In closing, may you never forget that the Universe only asked a very few of us to devote our lives to the service of others…and you said yes. Blessings and congratulations Class of 2016.

 

Teresa of Calcutta: A Life of Caring and Service

Mother Teresa Documentary

 

Life as a Young Sister

Captivated by stories of missionaries, Agnes left her family home in Skopje in 1928 at the age of 18 to join the Sisters of Loreto. “Be so kind to hear my sincere desire,” she humbly wrote to the Loreto Mother Superior. “I want to join your Society, so that one day I may become a missionary sister, and work for Jesus who died for us all.”

Needing to learn English first, the young postulant spent six weeks in Loreto Abbey in Dublin, Ireland. She set sail for India on December 1, 1928, to give her life to service.

Call within a Call

For years, Mother Teresa refused to talk about this seminal moment in her life. But worldwide interest in her “call within a call” would not diminish. Reluctantly, she spoke about it. “God was calling me to give up all and to surrender myself to him in the service of the poorest of the poor in the slums.”

The call happened on September 10, 1946, as she traveled by train from Calcutta to Darjeeling. Suddenly, a new mission presented itself. “To fail would have been to break the faith,” she said.

Relief for Calcutta’s Suffering

Mother Teresa opened wide the doors of mercy and charity for the poorest of the poor in Calcutta. It was her life’s calling—what she considered to be an order from God. Mother Teresa directed her Missionaries of Charity to serve “the hungry, the naked, the homeless, the crippled, the blind, the lepers, all those people who feel unwanted, unloved, uncared for throughout society, people who have become a burden to the society and are shunned by everyone.”

One of Mother Teresa’s deepest fears after she founded the Missionaries of Charity was that she or one of her sisters and brothers would do or say something to cause scandal or detract from the Order’s mission. In all likelihood this explains, at least in part, her reluctance to speak publicly of the interior locutions she had experienced for seven or eight months after the call within a call came on the train to Darjeeling.

Yet Teresa did cause scandal, although only after she’d been dead for a decade, and then only for a short time. In 2007, Come Be My Light, a book that collected many of her most personal and private correspondence, was published. It immediately caused sorrow and confusion in her admirers and a glee that bordered on what the Germans call schadenfreude, taking pleasure in another’s misfortune, in her detractors.

Her letters revealed that, except for one short period, Teresa had been afflicted with a deep sense of God’s absence for the last half-century of her life. Such was her unflagging dedication to the work she’d undertaken for God that most of the world was completely unsuspecting of her spiritual darkness.

On hearing the news, many Christians were confused. What did Teresa’s long stay in the spiritual wilderness mean? Was she a victim of depression? Had she lost faith in God? What gave her the inner strength to carry on even when she anguished over what she felt to be God’s abandonment of her?

Even Teresa’s closest companions in the Missionaries of Charity were bewildered. Never had she made any reference to the darkness except for an oblique reference that would’ve meant nothing to anyone but her confessors with whom she shared what she was going through. Four years before she died, she warned her sisters that “the Devil” is continuously on the prowl in order to “make you feel it is impossible that Jesus really loves you, is really cleaving to you. This is a danger for all of us.” None of them could have guessed that the remark was autobiographical.

For their part, Teresa’s detractors pointed to the revelations in Come Be My Light as evidence that Teresa was a faux-saint whose public displays of piety were hypocritical. Longtime critic Christopher Hitchens declared that the letters revealed Teresa to be a “confused old lady” who had “ceased to believe,” and whose service to others was nothing more than “part of an effort to still the misery within.” He also argued that the Catholic Church’s interpretation of Teresa’s time in the desert as a dark night of the soul was a perverse piece of marketing that sought to spin despair as faith.
A Soul in Anguish

There’s no sense in denying that Mother Teresa’s sojourn in the wilderness is disconcerting. If God can seem absent to a saint like her, what chance do the rest of us have to connect with God? It’s also quite probably true, given the nature of her work among the poorest of the poor, that at times Teresa felt psychologically depressed or burnt out. What normal person wouldn’t? But to conclude that the darkness was the result of depression, much less loss of faith, is to overlook its spiritual significance.

Psychological depression is me-centered; the depressive’s gaze is always directed inward. Teresa’s, on the other hand, was directed outward, to the God whose absence she so keenly felt. Depression renders a sufferer listless; Mother Teresa was always on the go, doing the work to which she felt God had called her. Moreover, dark periods don’t necessarily suggest a loss of faith. Instead, they are recognized in the Christian tradition as periods of great spiritual development.

Many Christian saints have recounted their own experiences of darkness in their relationships with God, but it was the sixteenth-century St. John of the Cross who wrote what’s still considered to be the best analysis of them. Not surprisingly, Mother Teresa knew his writings, and once remarked that even though John’s words made her “hunger for God,” they also expressed what for her was “the terrible feeling of being ‘unwanted’ by Him.”

For John of the Cross, the noche oscura or “dark night of the soul” is a forlorn feeling of being abandoned by God. “Both the sense and the spirit,” he writes, “as though under an immense and dark load, undergo such agony and pain that the soul would consider death a relief.” The soul suffers most from the conviction that “God has rejected it, and with abhorrence cast it into darkness.” 

But what feels like abandonment is far from it. The painful sense of being rejected by God is actually a purgation of the senses and spirit that prepares the way for an “inflow of God into the soul.” There is no set time limit for a dark night of the soul, although most do not last as long as Mother Teresa’s did. Nor does the dark night mean that the sufferer has ceased to believe in God, although intense doubts can arise.

In one of her letters, Mother Teresa writes, “In my soul I feel just that terrible pain of loss—of God not wanting me—of God not being God—of God not really existing.”8 But the occasional dreadful thought that God may be a fiction wasn’t her primary torment.

Even if Teresa had never read John of the Cross’s description of the noche oscura, she would’ve had some idea of it from her namesake, St. Thérèse de Lisieux, the Little Flower, who likewise suffered from a sense of abandonment toward the end of her short life. Thérèse wrote that “God hides, is wrapped in darkness,” and she accounted for this by arguing that the love of Christ is so overwhelming that its fullness has to be withheld from mortals, a withdrawal that naturally causes suffering.

Mother Teresa’s suffering when God hid from her was intense. From first to last, her private correspondence to her confessors attests to that. Just a few passages, representative of the whole, convey something of the loneliness into which her sense of God’s absence drove her.

The longing for God is terribly painful and yet the darkness is becoming greater.        What contradiction there is in my soul.

          —The pain within is so great…Please ask Our Lady to be my Mother in this darkness.

          The place of God in my soul is blank—There is no God in me.

          In the darkness…Lord, my God, who am I that You should forsake me?…

          The one You have thrown away as unwanted—unloved.

          I call, I cling,

          I want—and there is no One to answer—no One on

          Whom I can clin—no, No One. Alone. The darkness is so dark—and I am alone.

          Before I used to get such help & consolation from spiritual direction—from the time the work has started— nothing.

“The work” Teresa mentions in the last quotation refers, of course, to the ministry to which she was called on that providential train trip to Darjeeling. What especially bewildered and saddened her was that the darkness had descended in 1949, right when she believed she was doing precisely the work God had created her to do. Her loss of the presence of God coincided with the granting of the long-sought permission to found the order that became the Missionaries of Charity. Surely the Vatican’s approval was a sign from God that he loved her and wanted her to succeed. But it was just at that point that she felt the door slam shut. God disappeared.

There was to be but one time the door opened in her many years of darkness. Pius XII was the pontiff who gave permission to found her Order. When he died in October 1958, Archbishop Périer celebrated a requiem Mass in the Calcutta cathedral. Teresa attended, and on that same day received a respite from her forlornness. As she wrote Périer, “I prayed to [Pius] for a proof that God is pleased with the Society. There & then disappeared that long darkness, that pain of loss—of loneliness—of that strange suffering of ten years. Today my soul is filled with love.”

But in just a short time, God “thought it better for me to be in the tunnel—so He is gone again.” Teresa would endure the tunnel for the next four decades.
‘Yes to God’

As the years of darkness came and went, Mother Teresa slowly began to see them as something different from the dark night of the soul described by John of the Cross and experienced by Thérèse de Lisieux. It was, she concluded, an essential part of her vocation as a Missionary of Charity.

Even as a teenager back in Skobje, Teresa had longed to serve the poor. When she became a missionary nun, she spent her Sundays roaming the slums around the Loreto compound bringing relief to the poor. When she received the call within a call, she dedicated the rest of her life to giving the poor, the sick, the lonely, and the dying the love that the world had denied them. Moreover, she voluntarily took on their poverty as her own.

Teresa dedicated her life to this work because she believed that Christ demanded it of her. As she so often said, when she succored the poor and the sick, she ministered to Christ in his distressing disguise, the Christ who thirsted. So it was perhaps inevitable, given that she shared in the suffering of the people she served, that Teresa would eventually discern her own inner poverty as a share in the suffering of Christ himself. She remembered the oath she’d made back in 1942 never to deny God anything asked of her, and she realized that loyalty to the oath meant embracing God’s withdrawal.

“We must know exactly when we say yes to God what is in that yes. Yes means ‘I surrender,’ totally, fully, without any counting the cost.” It meant accepting whatever God gave, and giving whatever God chose to take away. And for Teresa, it meant accepting the burden of Christ’s Passion.

When she was allowed that insight into the nature of her darkness, she recognized it as an inevitable aspect of the call within a call, and would go so far as to say that she actually loved the darkness because it was “a part, a very, very small part of Jesus’ darkness & pain on earth.”


Lost and Found

Teresa’s final years were ones in which poor health and physical suffering became her daily burden. Just a few months before her death, suffering from heart failure and pneumonia, she lay in a hospital bed, unable to speak because of the bronchial tube that had been inserted to help her breathe. She tried to communicate with her caretakers by writing on slips of paper, but was too weak to do so. Finally, mustering all her strength, she was able to scrawl, “I want Jesus.” Mass was celebrated in her hospital room and she was able to take a small amount of the consecrated wine.

Those who were with her at the time believed that her request for Jesus meant that she desired the Eucharist, and that’s surely a part of what she meant to communicate. But given her decades of living without a sense of Christ’s presence, it’s not too much to conclude that she also meant she wanted the darkness of God’s withdrawal to end. She’d spent over fifty years reliving Christ’s Passion. If it was God’s will that she suffer, so be it. But she longed for it to end.

In 1962, in the second decade of her sense of abandonment, Teresa wrote something that anticipated her later understanding of her vocation to suffer the Passion of Christ, “If I ever become a saint—I will surely be one of ‘darkness.’ I will continually be absent from heaven—to light the light of those in darkness on earth.”

This is an extraordinary thing to say, because it suggests that Mother Teresa was willing to relinquish the joy of heaven for the sake of those of us who also lie awake in the night wondering where God has gone. No one would deny that the diminutive nun who served Christ in his distressing disguise for over fifty years deserved some rest. But Teresa thought otherwise. Her lifelong dedication to serving God in his people was, so far as she was concerned, only an apprenticeship for her real work after she died.

This is an excerpt from the book St. Teresa of Calcutta: Missionary, Mother, Mystic, published by Franciscan Media.

 

Free Veterans Eligibility Calculator Guest Post Originally Published in Senior Blog Living

Free Veterans Eligibility Calculator

 

There are many benefits out there for veterans, but sometimes determining eligibility can be confusing.

VeteranAid.org recently released an eligibility benefit calculator for the VA Aid and Attendance benefit to you help simplify the process for you and your loved ones. Get started to discover how your family can save both time and money.

The VA Aid and Attendance Benefit and Veterans Eligibility

Hundreds of thousands are eligible for this little-known, yet incredibly helpful, VA benefit, including spouses of veterans. Funds can be used to help pay for senior care and offer financial aid to the veterans and their family who deserve them. A Place for Mom has helped guide more than 410,000 veterans in their searches for senior care and housing, and part of this assistance is educating families about the benefits they have earned, but may not know about.

This is where Veteran Aid’s helpful calculator comes in handy as a two-minute questionnaire will help you determine if your family has VA funds waiting for you to claim.

Education is king when it comes to funding retirement and senior care costs. Every little bit of financial assistance can help; especially if it’s money a veteran in your family has already earned. Here are a few ways the VA Aid and Attendance benefit can assist your family:

  1. The Veterans Aid and Attendance (A&A) Pension provides benefits that reduce the cost of care for veterans and surviving spouses who require assisted living.
  2. The A&A Pension can provide up to $1,788 per month to a veteran, $1,149 per month to a surviving spouse, or $2,120 per month to a couple. A veteran filing with a sick spouse is eligible for up to $1,406 per month.
  3. Like Social Security, this pension is dependable and is paid directly to you by the Department of Treasury.

Overview of Questions You Will Be Asked About Veterans Eligibility

If you want to gather information ahead of time, the eligibility calculator will ask the following questions to help determine eligibility:

1. Who are you looking for?

Are you looking for financial assistance for yourself, a parent, grandparent, other relative, or friend? You will need to specify in the questionnaire.

2. Are you or is your spouse a veteran?

You will need to determine whether either you or your spouse served the country in active duty.

3. Did you serve at least 90 days of active duty with at least 1 day during one of these approved periods of war?

To be eligible for benefits, a veteran must have served at least 90 days of active duty, with one or more of those days occurring during wartime. This does not mean that the veteran had to see actual combat.

If the active duty occurred after September 7, 1980, you must have served at least 24 months or the full period that you were called to duty.

The VA’s dates of wartime are as follows:

  • Mexican Border War: May 9, 1916, through April 5, 1917
  • WWI: April 6, 1917, through November 11, 1918, extended to April 1, 1920, for those who served in the Soviet Union
  • WWII: December 7, 1941, through December 31, 1946, extended to July 25, 1947, where continuous with active duty on or before December 31, 1946
  • Korean Conflict: June 27, 1950, through January 31, 1955
  • Vietnam Era: August 5, 1964, through May 7, 1975. February 28, 1961, through May 7, 1975, for a veteran who served in the Republic of Vietnam during that period
  • Persian Gulf War: August 2, 1990, through a date to be prescribed by Presidential proclamation or law.91

4. Was the veteran honorably discharged from service?

The veteran had to be honorably discharged from service to be eligible for the benefit.

5. Do any of the following currently pertain to your parent(s) assistance needs?

In this question, you will determine what activities of daily living (ADLs), such as getting dressed, eating or using the restroom, your loved one may need assistance with.

If you or your loved one qualifies for the benefit, you will be directed to the “How to Apply” page, and will be given additional veteran senior care information and helpful resources.

Benefits Your Family Has Earned

Sadly, around 69% of veterans are completely unaware of the benefits available to them — and that means many veterans are paying more for their care than they should.

At A Place for Mom, our goal is to help families find the right senior care solution. For many families in the U.S., the hardest part of the process isn’t finding the right community, it’s figuring out how to pay for it, and the VA Aid and Attendance benefit calculator can help!

More than one third of Americans over 65 are either wartime veterans or the spouses of wartime vets. These individuals may qualify for a pension program through the Department of Veteran Affairs (VA), commonly referred to as “Aid & Attendance,” yet only a small fraction of those who are eligible actually know about this benefit. So get started today. Paying for senior living may be intimidating, but there are many resources available for our veteran senior loved ones. Educate yourself and try the A&A benefit eligibility calculator. You have nothing to lose!

Do you or a loved one have veterans benefits? What would you like to let other families know about the veterans eligibility process? Share your story with us in the comments below.

Related Articles:

Free Veterans Eligibility Calculator posted by Dana Larsen http://www.aplaceformom.com/blog/8-11-16-free-veterans-eligibility-calculator/

About the Author

Dana Larsen is a writer, artist, editor, dancer and food-enthusiast living in the Pacific Northwest. Originally from Alaska, Dana has a passion for the outdoors and finding life’s next adventure. She graduated with honors from the University of Washington with a degree in English and Communications, and her writing has appeared in a variety of digital and print publications. She loves connecting audiences with ideas and is also an advocate for enhancing care and support for those affected by Alzheimer’s and other dementias. View.

Ellen DeGeneres Celebrates Nurses and Says Thank You To Nurse Kelley Johnson, RN

Miss America 2016 – While other contestants sang, danced or played instruments for the talent competition on the second night of preliminaries in Atlantic City, Kelley Johnson, Miss Colorado, delivered a unique monologue about experience as a nurse.

 

 

Listen To Kelly Johnson share that Ellen is able to be funny without offending anyone…

Miss Colorado had so many nice things to say about Ellen during the Miss America pageant, it only seemed fair to let her elaborate in person! Ellen and her friends at Shutterfly happened to have something nice for her too.

March 20th: Happy International Day of Happiness

New-Intl-Day-Happiness

 

Background

Speaking at the High Level Meeting on “Happiness and Well-Being: Defining a New Economic Paradigm” convened during the sixty-sixth session of the General Assembly, Secretary General Ban Ki-moon stated that the world “needs a new economic paradigm that recognizes the parity between the three pillars of sustainable development. Social, economic and environmental well-being are indivisible. Together they define gross global happiness.

The meeting was convened at an initiative of Bhutan, a country which recognized the supremacy of national happiness over national income since the early 1970s and famously adopted the goal of Gross National Happiness over Gross National Product.

The General Assembly of the United Nations in its resolution 66/281PDF document of 12 July 2012 proclaimed 20 March the International Day of Happiness recognizing the relevance of happiness and well-being as universal goals and aspirations in the lives of human beings around the world and the importance of their recognition in public policy objectives.

The United Nations invites Member States, international and regional organizations, as well as civil society, including non-governmental organizations and individuals, to observe the International Day of Happiness in an appropriate manner, including through education and public awareness-raising activities.

Secretary-General’s Message

This year’s International Day of Happiness is focused on Climate Action for a Happy Planet.

Everyone can be part of our campaign: governments, civic groups, the media and individuals. This year, even cartoon characters have joined in as the United Nations teams up with a group famous for lacking good cheer: the Angry Birds.

These animated ambassadors are helping to raise awareness about the importance of climate action for our common future. You can join them by sharing your own climate actions using the hashtag #AngryBirdsHappyPlanet.

At this time of grave injustices, devastating wars, mass displacement, grinding poverty and other manmade causes of suffering, the International Day of Happiness is a global chance to assert that peace, well-being and joy deserve primacy. It is about more than individual contentment; it is an affirmation that we have a collective responsibility to humanity.

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is our plan to realize a life of dignity for all people. By advancing progress towards the interlinked Sustainable Development Goals, we can help spread happiness and secure peace.

The best way to celebrate this International Day of Happiness is by taking action to alleviate suffering. In this spirit, let us use this occasion to renew a global spirit of solidarity to create a safer, more prosperous and more sustainable future for all.

Documents and Resources

7 Best Traits All Authentic Leaders Have in Common A Guest Post by Adrienne Partridge

personalLeadership_Icon_611

 

You have most likely heard the word authentic used in conjunction with leadership. Is authentic leadership just a buzz phrase or something you should actually care about as you continue to develop yourself as a leader? It is definitely something you should care about and here’s why: Authentic leadership is genuine leadership.

Business growth is more apt to come about with authentic leadership because it is transparent and promotes a growth mindset instead of fixed mindset, while authenticity instills a work culture of personal growth, accountability, and innovation.

Here are seven characteristics that all authentic leaders share:

#1: You know who you are and what you stand for

This is the most important authentic leadership trait because you cannot possess the other 6 characteristics if you do not first know who you are and what you are all about. You, in turn, are are not afraid to be yourself, show yourself, and let your values be known to others.

#2: You transparently interact with others

People know where they stand with you because you are open and honest in your interactions. You don’t say and do things just to please others or to maintain the status quo just to not rock the boat.

#3: You follow your gut

Since you know who you are and what you stand for, you are in-tune with your gut. You listen to what your gut tells you and you do it. But, at the same time you check your gut by listening and absorbing the feedback and opinions of others before you make important decisions.

#4: You adhere to a code of ethics 

Authenticity denotes that you are inherently ethical in your business and personal dealings. Some professions, such as law and medicine have their own code of ethics that you as that professional have to follow.  If your profession does not have an established code of ethics, you have adopted your own and exercise those in everything you do.

#5: Your life’s work is bigger than you 

While your life’s purpose and work is driven by your own personal interest and passion, you are driven by something bigger than you, whether you want to make your employees’ lives better, your goal is to create something to benefit your immediate community, or your product is truly designed to make the world a better place.

#6: Humility 

You have the humility to admit when you are wrong or have made a mistake. You can truly ask for forgiveness when it’s necessary and take steps to make it right again.

You don’t overuse the word sorry, but instead reserve an apology for the most appropriate of circumstances.

#7: You embody the 3 C’s: Compassion, Curiosity, and Courage 

The 3 C’s are: Compassion, Curiosity, and Courage. Since you possess the 6 other characteristics mentioned above, you embody the 3 C’s.

  • Compassion: You are not only compassionate to others, but also you engage in self-compassion. This is an especially important practice when you are faced with your shortcomings as a leader. You are kind to yourself in these moments.
  • Curiosity: You engage with yourself and those you lead from a place of curiosity. When you disagree with a colleague, you are curious about their point of view, instead of judgmental. You are curious as a means by which to understand, not judge.
  • Courage: Self-compassion and curiosity are what allows you to be a courageous leader. When you exhibit your courage and fail, self-compassion is what picks you up and allows you to be courageous again.

Authentic leaders may not exhibit all of these characteristics at the same time because authentic leadership involves developing more tolerance for vulnerability, which is difficult.  As Dr. Brene Brown says, “Vulnerability is the birthplace of courage.” Authentic leadership is courageous leadership because you have to make yourself vulnerable by showing others who you truly are, which also opens you up for criticism.

Authentic leadership and transparent work culture are one in the same: you cannot have one without the other.  A leader does not suddenly become an authentic leader, just like a work culture doesn’t one day become transparent. Authentic leadership is a constant journey and commitment to your own growth and the growth of something bigger than yourself.

contributor, Inc.com

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