Giving Your Caregiver a Game Plan A Guest Post by Maggie Drag

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Nothing makes me happier than hearing about the way our caregivers bring a smile to their clients’ lives. In fact, that is what makes us so dedicated to our work- the men and women that are genuinely excited to spread joy and love wherever they go. After celebrating our 6th Annual Caregiver Party with our most dedicated staff members and caregivers, we felt that it was necessary to bring some inspiration to their daily routine. Here are some tips for each and every caregiver to feel empowered, valued and dedicate themselves to working in “me time” to each and every day.

Better Diet, Better You!

No matter if you are a live-in caregiver or an hourly caregiver, be sure that you are dedicating some time to prepare a hearty, balanced breakfast for yourself each morning. Enjoy your mornings- don’t dread them. You are what you eat, so look up some healthy recipes that you’ve never tried before. Regardless of what others may say, there are so many easy ways to prepare healthy dishes for yourself (especially salads ) that will lift your mood while filling you up with plenty of nutrients. Try preparing rice and different vegetables to have nearby to fill up your lunchbox quickly and to avoid eating junk food on the go.

Get moving!

The best way to stay motivated after getting through your week is to get moving (trust me!) If you love to dance, go to Zumba classes, swim, job, bike – anything, make sure you aren’t putting it off! Not only will you feel better after fitting in a short workout into your day, but you’ll be able to take on the week with much more confidence! If you hate the idea of going to the gym, try this: buy yourself a pair of light weights (preferably 2-5 lbs), soft workout mat and sleek new workout outfit. You can find a great variety of workout gear in fun colors and designs at TJ Maxx or Marshalls. This, plus any workout video on YouTube (from kickboxing to Pilates) = your best workout routine yet. And did we mention that you can do these while you’re on break from your caregiving assignment in the comfort of your own room?

Reach out to your Support Team

Always set some time aside to let the people who care about you know how you’re doing. Make a list of friends and family that you can count on for anything. It can include former clients and even some of your client’s family members that you bonded with over the years. Last but not least, don’t forget the staff at your agency. We, as well as any agency should live for caring for their caregivers.

Embrace your inner and outer beauty

Nothing boosts confidence more than the simple act of taking care of yourself. Of course, putting yourself first takes a bit of time and effort. Whether you have a job or are looking for a caregiver job at the moment, here are some simple ways to rediscover what you love about yourself- inside and out.There’s nothing better than a free makeover at your favorite beauty counter, or a refreshing swim or workout at your local gym. These special moments are known as, “me time”, and you should know that you deserve every minute of it. Besides getting a massage or spa treatment, there are countless ways to pamper yourself at home if you’re on a budget. Since you are on your feet most of the day like many caregivers, treat yourself to a soothing bubble bath try looking up do-it-yourself face masks on YouTube and video guides to meditation and yoga.

What are some ways you as a caregiver or agency motivate yourselves to care for yourself? Comment below, we’d love to hear some of your ideas!

BIO:

Maggie Drag is the owner and founder of a homecare agency located in central Connecticut. With over 27 years of experience in the industry, Maggie shares her knowledge and tips about care at home.  Visit homecare4u.com  to learn more about Maggie Drag.

 

Caregiving For Dementia Patients A Guest Post by Olivia Wolfe

Dementia

Caring for dementia patients can be frustrating and difficult. Because dementia patients are suffering from a brain disorder, basic communication can be a challenge. With that said, we have partnered with Private Home Care in St. Louis to showcase some things that will help you to communicate with people that have dementia effectively. Communication is the key to excellent care.

Get The Patient’s Attention When You Enter The Room

It’s easy for patients with dementia to become disoriented. Even minor surprises can set them on edge. Because of this, it’s important to get the attention of a patient before you interact with them.

Even if the door to the room they are in is open, you should know before entering. You should also call out their name and make sure they see you. If you let them know you are going to be entering the room, they will be prepared to interact with you.

Set A Positive Mood

You should always be pleasant and friendly when you interact with a patient that has dementia. People with dementia often experience significant amounts of anxiety. If you can create a positive environment, you will be able to alleviate that anxiety.

When you greet a patient with dementia, you should greet them with a big smile. Be pleasant and cheerful whenever they ask you questions. If you’re friendly and happy, they will know that they can relax around you.

Keep Things Simple

People with dementia can’t always think quickly. You should use simple words when you are interacting with them. While you shouldn’t necessarily treat a dementia patient like a child, you should try to keep things simple. Work to avoid confusing them.

You don’t need to use medical terminology when talking to them. You should always make your explanations clear and easy to understand. If a dementia patient does not know what is going on, they are going to become anxious. This could cause behavioral issues. Try to keep things simple when you provide care. If the patient can follow what you are doing, they won’t have to worry.

Have Fun With The Patient

While dementia patients may lose some mental abilities, they still have a sense of humor. It’s okay to joke around with a dementia patient from time to time. If you can get them laughing, it will be that much easier for you to get them to relax.

Obviously, you shouldn’t make fun of a dementia patient; you don’t want them to be the butt of your jokes. However, a few simple, lighthearted comments should be enough to set them at ease. You may even be able to get them to make a joke of their own.

Don’t Just Listen With Your Ears

When you’re interacting with a dementia patient, you need to listen to them carefully. It isn’t always easy for people with dementia to express themselves. You need to pay close attention to what they tell you.

However, you shouldn’t just listen with your ears. You should also pay close attention to the way the patient is behaving. If you can see that the patient is anxious or upset, you need to try to address that.

Try to remain focused on the patient you’re caring for at all times. If you pay attention to them, you’ll be able to see what they need. Being receptive to a patient’s needs is an essential part of being a caregiver.

Break Things Down Into Steps

It can be hard for dementia patients to process a lot of information at once. That’s why it’s smart for you to break things down. Instead of overloading them with information, you should present them with one thing at a time.

If you are planning on getting a patient ready for a doctor’s appointment, try breaking down each step of the process. Tell them you are going to brush their teeth, brush their hair, get them dressed, and take them outside. If you handle things one step at a time, the patient will understand what is happening in the moment.

Reassure Your Patient

Whenever you see your patient looking nervous or confused, you should reassure them. A little bit of encouragement can go a long way. Make sure your patient knows that everything is going well.

If you regularly praise or reassure a dementia patient, they will know that they are doing what they are supposed to do. If they are getting praised, they won’t want to panic. It will be easy for them to remain calm as you provide care.

There are a lot of challenges associated with caring for dementia patients. With that said, proper communication will make it easier for you to provide essential care. As long as you’re ready for the challenges associated with caregiving for dementia patients, you should be able to provide high standards of care.

Cardinal Tips For Caregivers of Senior HIV Patients A Guest Post by David Beeshaw

Elderly woman and young female caregiver at home

In 2014, people aged 55+ accounted for 17% of Americans living with a diagnosed HIV infection.

Even if this age group has the same risk factors as young people, they might be less aware of them – especially since most awareness campaigns don’t target older adults. Most of the time, they don’t think HIV is an issue for them and may be less likely to protect themselves. That’s why it’s older Americans that are most likely to learn about their HIV infection later in the course of their disease.  As a result, they start the treatment late and might suffer from more damage to their immune system.

These are the basic facts every caregiver should know before starting to provide care for senior patients with a diagnosed HIV infection.

However, that’s not everything. Here are 4 critical tips for caregivers of senior HIV patients.

Be aware of the stigma

Patients diagnosed with HIV often face social stigma and might be suffering from lack of support from others in their circle of family and friends who in turn might lack knowledge about HIV. Older people might already feel isolated because of their illness or loss of friends and family.

Social stigma might affect their self-image and quality of life. It often discourages these patients from seeking care or disclosing their status to others. Adults diagnosed with HIV are 5 times more likely to experience depression and be at risk of suicide than HIV-negative adults.

HIV and aging

Aging with HIV infection is challenging because the disease increases the risks that come with aging: particular cancers, thin bones, or cardiovascular disease.

That’s why care providers should make sure to maximize their efforts to prevent these conditions and look for signs of illness early on. Caregivers should also pay attention to the potential interactions between medication used to treat HIV and those used by the patient to treat common age-related conditions such as obesity, elevated cholesterol, diabetes, or hypertension.

Antiretroviral treatment allows patients diagnosed with HIV to achieve a near-normal life expectancy. However, senior patients are more vulnerable to infections and illnesses because of their age. Caregivers should minimize their exposure to common illnesses such as the flu that could bring about complications (like pneumonia) for patients with a compromised immune system.

Research the disease

Caregivers should educate themselves about HIV and AIDS. Knowing how the HIV infection is spread is a helpful measure against social stigma. Caregivers should also know how an HIV infection develops and when it might lead to the patient developing AIDS. Being aware of what different treatment regimens entail is helpful as well.

Follow these rules while providing care

Caregivers who provide care to senior patients diagnosed with HIV should know how the infection is spread and what they can do to prevent it.

Here are some tips on how to prevent the spread of HIV infection while taking care of a diagnosed patient:

  • Always wear vinyl or latex gloves if you might have contact with bodily fluids or blood from a person infected with HIV. Wear such gloves when cleaning articles soiled with vomit, feces or urine to avoid infection with other germs. Remember to wash your hands after any contact with blood, even if you wore gloves.
  • Flush all liquid waste that contains the patient’s blood down the toilet.
  • Items that aren’t flushable (sanitary pads, paper towels, wound dressings) need to be placed in a plastic bag. Close the bag securely before throwing it out. Remember to check in with your local health department about the disposal of such items.
  • Cover all breaks, cuts or sores in your exposed skin.
  • Wash all clothing and linens together – those worn by the patient don’t need to be separated.
  • Dishes used by the patient don’t need to be separated and can be cleaned using regular methods.
  • Be positive!

Follow these 4 tips and you’ll be on your way to providing top-quality care to a senior patient who has been diagnosed with an HIV infection.

Author’s Bio:

David Beeshaw is a staunch advocate of regular exercise and leading a healthy lifestyle. He is also a writer at raTrust, a non-profit organization dedicated to helping those at risk of STIs and HIV. Verify raTrust on BizDb.

Navigating Medicare – Understanding Medical Supplies vs. Durable Medical Equipment A Guest Post by Rodger Sims

Medicare

Medicare is a health insurance program that covers people who are over 65 and can cover younger people with disabilities and people suffering from kidney failure, known as end-stage renal disease (ESRD). With over 71.3 million people enrolled, Medicare is one of the largest insurance providers for seniors in the United States. If your loved ones are enrolled in Medicare, it is important to know how to navigate your options.

There are four different parts to Medicare:

Medicare Part A

Part A covers your hospital insurance. This coverage includes inpatient hospital stays, care in a nursing facility, hospital care and even some home health care. If you’ve worked over ten years and have paid into social security taxes, this coverage is free to you. In 2015, Medicare Part A had served 7.7 million patients.

Medicare Part B

Part B covers medical insurance and includes certain doctor’s services, outpatient care, medical supplies and preventative services. In 2015, Medicare Part B had served over 33.8 million seniors.

Medicare Part C

Part C is a health care plan offered by a private company that can help you with both Part A and B benefits. Known as a Medicare Advantage (MA) Plan, services offered include health maintenance organizations (HMO), preferred provider organizations (PPO), private fee-for-service plans, special needs plans and Medicare Health Savings Account (HSA) plans. Most of the Medicare Advantage Plans offer coverage for prescription drugs.

Medicare Part D

Part D of Medicare adds prescription coverage to the original Medicare, as well as to some Medicare cost plans, Medicare HSA and some private fee-for-service plans. In 2015, 38.9 million Americans utilized Part D of Medicare. Original Medicare is the tradition fee-for-service Medicare. The government pays directly for the health care services the patient receives.

Durable Medical Equipment vs. Medical Supplies

With all that in mind, it is also important to know that there are two main types of products: medical supplies and durable medical equipment (DME). Both DME and medical supplies are used to make meeting the basic needs of the elderly, ill or disabled patients at home.

Durable Medical Equipment

As suggested by the name, durable medical equipment is meant for long-term use. Medicare defines DME by the following criteria: durability, ability to be used in the home, not usually useful to someone who isn’t sick and must have a life span of three years of use. Examples of DME include hospital beds, mobility aids, prostheses (artificial limbs), orthotics (therapeutic footwear) and other supplies. Medicare pays for DME partially under Part A if the patient qualifies for home health benefit.

To qualify for home health benefit, the patient must be unable to leave his/her home, require care from a skilled nurse and does not require custodial care, such as bathing and toilet-usage. If the patient is eligible for home health benefit, Medicare will cover 80% of the allowable amount for DME.

An example of the allowable amount is the following: a patient needs a walker that costs $200. The allowable amount for the walker in that state is $100. Since Medicare will cover 80% of the allowable amount, the patient will then have to pay $120 for the walker. Under Medicare’s Part B coverage, the co-pay is the same at 20% of the allowable amount and any other additional expense after that.

For Medicare Part B, the patient does not need to qualify for home health benefit to be eligible for coverage. If a doctor or medical professional considers the product medically necessary, Medicare will partially reimburse the patient for it. One benefit of this is the ability to rent the product being needed and still be eligible for reimbursement.

Some DME products that are not covered by Medicare include hearing aids and home adaptation items like bathroom safety and ramps. Additionally, to be reimbursed, your product supplier must be enrolled in Medicare and adhere to their guidelines. If they are not, Medicare can refuse their claims.

Make sure your providers are eligible before purchasing any products.

Medical Supplies

Medical supplies are made for short-term use. They are typically used once then thrown away. Examples of medical supplies include diabetic sugar testing strips, incontinence products (diapers, catheters, etc.) and items like bandages and protective gloves. Generally, medical supplies are not covered by Medicare, though there are a few exceptions for patients with diabetes, ostomy patients and those currently using feeding tubes. These items, however, are limited.

Ostomy products can be limited to a certain number a month. If necessary, a patient can appeal to increase the number of products received a month but must go through a process to do so. This process includes re-approval through Medicare and by a doctor.

Your Options

If you can provide insurance for your loved ones and cost isn’t a large factor, it is useful to know that Medicare can be paired up with other private insurance companies. Doing so can help get over some of the limitations that are imposed by Medicare and ensure your senior has an overall health coverage. If this is not an option, then medical supplemental health insurance, known as Medigap, can help provide funds for expenses Medicare doesn’t cover.

To qualify for the Medigap program, you must be enrolled in both Medicare Part A and Medicare Part B. Medigap can cover excess costs, like co-insurance costs such as stays in the hospital or nursing home, and deductibles in Part A and Part B plans. Costs will vary according to coverage.

Medigap is available through private insurances or organizations that cater to the elderly.

Final Thoughts

Medicare covers durable medical equipment primarily under Part B, but also for DME for people under Part A with the home health benefit plan. Most medical supplies are not commonly covered by Medicare, and those that are covered tend to have limitations. Other options to ensure your senior has all their needs covered including pairing Medicare with a private insurance company or enrolling them in medical supplemental health insurance to help cover excess costs.

With the introduction and popularity of the internet, finding the supplies you need at the right cost is easier than ever before. Different websites offer low-cost medical supplies to help ensure the basic needs of your seniors are met. It is also easier to find the right insurance company for them with all the information available online.

For more information about Medicare and what it covers, got the Medicare website at Medicare.gov.

Images

https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/medicare-enrollment-form-glasses-398418109?src=YZoPqz-O9WK3A8VVD8TyZg-1-2

https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/empty-bed-on-hospital-ward-247358674?src=Q9ck6CAXE6czGlRyWlBoZA-1-2

https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/diabetes-test-blood-medical-equipment-506370463?src=jqL9R3jY1Q44pQysfDM6NQ-1-4

Sources:

https://www.medicare.gov/sign-up-change-plans/decide-how-to-get-medicare/whats-medicare/what-is-medicare.html

https://www.cms.gov/research-statistics-data-and-systems/statistics-trends-and-reports/cms-fast-facts/index.html 

 

Senior Tips – Best Financial Steps to Take When You Are Forced to Retire Early: A Guest Post by Alana Downer

Closeup of young woman with couple of elderly persons

Retirement confidence is at an all-time low with employees working later into their life in the hope that they don’t outlive their savings. A recent Australian report found that 51% of retirees expected to outlive their savings. Because of stats like these, people are aiming to work longer and harder to ensure a comfortable retirement, however this isn’t always the reality. A 2015 study from the Employee Benefit Research Institute found that in 2013, 47% of workers were forced to retire earlier than planned.

Forced early retirement can be more common than you might think. There are many factors which can contribute to an early retirement, among other reasons these include, job loss, loss of stamina or poor health. So, what should you do? Whether as an employee faced with early retirement, or a carer who knows someone forced into an earlier retirement? Here’s our best financial steps you should consider taking:

Assess your cash flow and income:

Your first step is to not panic! All too often people think cancelling their gym membership will help them. This small weekly or monthly fee won’t see the quality of your retirement improve drastically and going to the gym is great for your health.

Instead, what you should do is list your monthly income and expenses. Consider what benefits you can receive now that you are a retiree. Look at your health, car, life, and other insurance plans and see where you can make some savings. You may also qualify for involuntary unemployment cover. Track all your monthly expenses and know how much money you need exactly for one month. From there you can estimate how long the money you have saved will last.

Create a retirement plan:

A retirement plan is something you should be working on before you are retired, but if an early retirement has come suddenly and you find yourself without one, it’s not too late to set one in motion. You can base your plan around either retirement goals or create a cash-flow plan.

A cash-flow plan is based around investments, income and expenses, and making assumptions about inflation and how you will be able to spend throughout your retirement.

A goal based plan lets you plan major events, trips and really anything you want to achieve during your retirement. This is a good system as you can prioritise what you want to do, understand the associated costs and foresee what and how much you will be able to do.

Look for alternative ways to create income:

If you find yourself in need some extra income, or you just want to use your time to cover some expenses so you can take that retirement holiday a little sooner, there are several options you could consider.

A popular approach with some retirees is to begin trading. In recent years trading on the Forex market has become a largely successful approach to profitable trading. Of course, this takes some time to learn as there are certain strategies which must be used.

Other options include finding part time work. Maybe you love gardening, use the forced retirement as a time to pursue any careers you might be passionate about, even if they aren’t as serious as your previous full-time career.

Consult with a professional:

Retirement can be difficult to plan for, even at the best of times. Unexpected things can happen and you want to ensure you have enough money to live out your retirement comfortably and even enjoy it.

Meeting with a financial adviser can help you take specific steps towards a better retirement. They can help create budgets, suggest where to invest your money and build a financial plan that suits your specific situation.

Also think about your pension and how you want to receive it. The rate will change depending on your status, so it’s important to ensure you understand what you are eligible for.

The key to overcoming a forced early retirement and the associated financial challenges is planning. These steps are a great start to planning your retirement and can help you to achieve any retirement goals you have in mind.

 

Bio:

Alana Downer is a financial blogger and a part of the team behind Learn to Trade, a source of educational information for traders and investors. Having been always interested in achieving financial freedom, Alana might often be found sharing her strategies online with all those who wish to earn money on the side and become financially independent.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natural Healing Methods For A Family Member With Alzheimer’s Disease: A Guest Post by Katrina Jane Rice

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First of all it is important to note that no cure has been yet found for Alzheimer’s Disease.

Unfortunately science has not yet identified any definite medical treatment that can halt the progression of this disorder. For now all we can do for our loved ones is to give them a better quality of life while doctors and researchers continue to look for a  cure to this lethal disease.

Because there is not a single cure for it right now, doctors are gearing towards fighting the symptoms of the disease and the different ways of managing them. The main goal is to improve patients’ quality of life and it can be achieved by incorporating traditional and alternative treatments.

While most supplements are not approved by the FDA, some members of the medical community have supported their use.

These natural treatments are not just here to help a patient deal with the Alzheimer’s Disease, they are also utilized to stave off diabetes, strokes, and other age-related health problems that can cause more discomfort to your loved one.

If you are interested in alternative medicine, below are some of the natural treatments that a patient can use to improve his or her condition. Make sure to consult with your physician first. They know the true scope and the severity of the disease and they will help you identify which of these alternative treatments can be the most effective.

Herbal Medicine

Most herbal medicine claiming to treat neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s are effective due to their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and one good example is ginkgo biloba. A number of clinical studies were conducted on this herb and its benefits on cognitive impairment among Alzheimer’s patients.

But this herb could also hinder or interact with other prescribed medication and instead of improving their health, it can possibly pose a threat to it. So make sure you talk to your doctor about taking herbal supplements.

Though the research on ginkgo biloba have proved a positive connection with the disease, there are still some people in the medical community who are not convinced by it.

Bright Light Therapy

One of the symptoms many Alzheimer’s patient suffer from is their disrupted circadian rhythm. It causes them to stay awake at night and wander around. This problem is due to the disruption of the portion of the brain that regulates the sleeping and waking cycle of the body. And one popular therapy to correct this problem is bright light therapy.

Studies state that the use of bright lights help restore the balance of patients’ circadian rhythm and improve their sleeping pattern. It also helps reduce evening agitation and daytime wakefulness.

Acupuncture

It is a traditional Chinese alternative medicine known to promote self-healing by the use of fine and sterile needles. This treatment is known to stimulate and improve the energy flow in your body.

According to some medical studies, acupuncture helps improve a person’s energy levels and mood swings. It also has the ability to relieve pain and improve cognitive functions.

It is advised that you get this treatment from a licensed practitioner who has experience in using this method to other Alzheimer’s suffering patients.

Since it also has other health benefits that can assist in improving a person’s quality of life, it may be worth trying this for your loved one.

Omega-3

You can get omega-3 from eating nuts, healthy oils and fish. A recent study found that consuming omega-3 fatty acid regularly improves one’s cognitive function. If you are worried of the mercury content from eating fish every day, you can give fish oil supplements to the patient instead.

CoQ10

Coenzyme Q10 is an important antioxidant to aid healthy body functions. It is also known to help prevent and slow Alzheimer’s disease. This supplement is quite easy to find as it is sold in most drug stores.

Coconut Oil

The fatty acid found in processed coconut oil is called caprylic acid. It is broken down in the body into a protein called ketone. A similar protein is used in a drug for Alzheimer’s called Ketasyn.

According to recent research, Ketasyn is used to improve the patient’s memory performance and prevent cognitive decline. Some people utilize coconut oil as an alternative to this drug.

Coral Calcium

Coral calcium is sourced from sea life and seashells. Though some believe that it is an effective alternative treatment for Alzheimer’s Disease, its claimed benefits are not yet proven by science.

Before you try this, ask the patient’s doctor first and know his or her thoughts about it. There was a formal complaint filed by the Federal Trade Commision against companies that strongly promote its healing properties for Alzheimer’s and you might want to read about it first..

What you can do now is research thoroughly on the different alternative treatments that can help heal Alzheimer’s Disease. No, they cannot cure the disease but they can definitely improve the patient’s overall health and quality of life.

After all, their treatment plan is their choice and you can help them make an informed decision by reading on different yet reliable research, reviews and testimonials about alternative medicine.

Once you and the patient make a decision, talk to your doctor right away to prevent any interactions caused by mixing prescription meds with alternative treatments.

For Further information Katrina can be reached at katrina.earthwell@gmail.com