When Caregivers Need Some Care: 8 Advantages of Caregiver Support Groups A Guest Post by David Beeshaw

Meeting Of Support Group

 

As a caregiver, you may be focused on looking after your loved one rather than looking after yourself. This can easily backfire, as you end up suffering both mentally and physically. If you start feeling lonely, depressed or extremely tired, a support group might be the best way to solve the situation. Here are seven advantages of attending one.

  1. They stop you feeling lonely

If you spend most of your time in the house and looking after just one person, you can start to feel isolated from the rest of society. You may feel as though the world is going on without you, and it’s easy to lose touch with your old friends when you are too busy to see them. Especially if you are working from home at the same time, loneliness can be a real issue. A support group will change all of that. You can feel like you are part of an extended family when you meet with other caregivers.

  1. You can gain more knowledge

What should you do when this happens? How can you cope with that? What’s the best thing to do in those situations? Other caregivers may well have experienced difficulties before you do, and can help you to understand how to deal with them. This knowledge will help you to be a better caregiver and reduce the stress on your shoulders.

  1. You can talk openly

You might never know how much stress you could release by talking until you do it. You might feel guilty about complaining or sharing negative thoughts, but a support group is a safe place to do this. Once you let those feelings out, you might be surprised to find that they don’t seem as serious as they did inside your head.

  1. They help normalise you

You may feel like you are the only person in the world dealing with your situation. Join a support group, however, and you will soon find that a lot of people are going through the same things that you are. They have the same doubts and fears, the same weird moments, and the same difficulties. Learning that what you are dealing with is normal will help immensely with your mental health.

  1. They put you in control

If you feel like being a caregiver is running your whole life, you may also feel powerless and out of control. Going to a caregiver support group will help you to understand that you are still in control of your whole life. Speaking to others will empower you.

  1. They help you cope

When times get tough, you may feel like giving up or curling up in a ball until it all goes away. The strategies that you learn, and the support you receive, from your group will help to improve your coping skills. You won’t feel that the situation is so bleak.

  1. They can raise your spirits

Caregivers often struggle with negative feelings. Distress, anxiety, and even depression can be common. You’ll be surprised at just how much your emotions can lift after attending a support group consisting of people who know your fears well and often experience them as well. Even if all you do is talk about your feelings, you’ll leave the meeting feeling lighter.

  1. You can explore treatment options

A support group will help to explore and discover new treatment options, as well as optimizing the ones you are currently using. Ultimately, this may mean that you can keep your loved one at home for longer and improve their quality of life, which is a goal that anyone would be happy to work towards.

Being a caregiver is hard, and no one expects you to bear that burden alone. Make time for a support group and you’ll see what a difference it can make.

 

About the author:

David Beeshaw is a health expert and a staunch supporter of safe sex who is currently supporting  raTrust.                                                                                                                               Feel free to verify raTrust on DirectorStats’ http://www.directorstats.co.uk/

raTrust, are experts in the field of STI and HIV prevention, David might often be found online, sharing his tips and suggestions for leading a healthy lifestyle.

5 Work From Home Jobs for Family Caregivers A Guest Post by Ruthie Serna

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Being a family caregiver is a full time job by itself. Unfortunately, it doesn’t bring in much cash. If you’re a family caregiver, you can still earn some money without sacrificing your current responsibilities. There are plenty of work from home jobs that can be quite lucrative, and many of them allow you to make your own schedule. Work out of your house on your own schedule and your own terms.

  1. Freelancer

Being a freelancer comes with a lot of options. You can do almost anything you do well, and charge rates you feel are fair for doing it. If you can edit or write, it’s easy to find a freelance position online. If you have specialty skills, such as graphic design or web design, you might fare even better. The best thing about freelancing is that it isn’t as set in stone as regular jobs – you can work whenever you have time. If your family keeps you busy, you can wait until all is well until you sit down to freelance for the day.

  1. eCommerce

Start a webstore! You can sell crafts you’ve made yourself, resell vintage clothing, or design products that can be sold through a company that will create and sell them for you. You don’t need to be an innovator or an entrepreneur to break into eCommerce – you only need to see a need and fill it with a web shop. There are plenty of platforms that allow people to list and sell without ever needing to build a webpage. It’s as simple as can be.

  1. Blogger

Most bloggers won’t make money at the beginning of their blog. If you update regularly and provide valuable content, you’d be surprised at the amount of moneymaking opportunities that will come along with blogging. Advertising revenue, sponsored posts, or even eBook opportunities could pop up over time. Pick something you’re passionate about (family caregiving, for example), and write to your heart’s content. You can even partner up with the writers of blogs you already love to read. Networking will get you everywhere.

  1. Remote Support or Service

Remote support and service jobs are relatively easy to find. They’re so common that they’re often listed on Gumtree alongside traditional positions. These jobs require a computer and phone access. A company directs their calls to you, where you will be able to troubleshoot, take feedback, and resolve issues from the comfort of your own desk. It’s almost like a call center job, but you won’t need to go anywhere to work. International companies deal with people from all over the world, so it’s easy for you to work whatever hours will fit into your schedule.

5.Tutoring or Teaching

If you have credentials as an educator, you might be able to secure a position in the eLearning industry. If you have any higher education at all, it’s easy to become an online tutor. Pick a subject you’re comfortable in and offer your services to students who may benefit from your wisdom. You can tutor privately or list yourself on a service that matches tutors to the students who need them most. Tutor as many or as few students as you have time for.

At the end of the day, it’s possible to have a career without sacrificing your caregiver relationships. It might be a little tricky to juggle, but it will only be a matter of time before you develop a system that works for you.

Ruthie is a contributing writer, always willing to share her knowledge and experiences. She loves to write articles that make lives of other mothers and entrepreneurs easier. She’s interested in health, well-being and self-improvement.

 

What is the difference between a nurse and a caregiver? A Guest Post by Tess Pajaron

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What is the difference between a nurse and a caregiver? If you’re asking yourself this question it’s likely that a parent or other elderly loved one is in need of some additional support. Or maybe you’re looking into career opportunities in the care of seniors. In either case, the difference between a nurse and a caregiver is an important distinction to determine before you make any important decisions.

Here is some information to help answer your question:

Nurse
Qualifications: The qualifications required to be a nurse depend upon the kind of nurse you’re looking at becoming or employing. Enrolled nurses have to study for two years at a Registered Training Organisation. Registered nurses have to study for three years at a university. The former is seen as practical training whilst the latter also encompasses some of the theory behind nursing and medical care. Becoming an enrolled nurse is usually seen as a stepping stone between working as a caregiver and working as a registered nurse.

Tasks: Both enrolled nurses and registered nurses are trained to perform medical tasks and procedures. They can put in an IV to help deliver medication or food, they can care for wounds and manage medication.They often also manage the non-medical aspects of a patient’s care including bathing and trips to the bathroom.

Where do they work? Nurses have great scope when it comes to deciding where they want to work. They can work at hospitals, clinics, retirement homes, assisted living facilities, hospices and in patients’ homes.

Caregiver
Qualifications: A caregiver often doesn’t need any formal qualifications but they are usually trained in CPR and emergency first aid. Whilst you don’t need to study to be a caregiver, you do need to possess certain qualities, including patience, compassion and resourcefulness.

Tasks: A caregiver can assist with the day to day activities of an elderly person. They help people to achieve tasks that age or illness prevent them from doing independently whilst remaining in the comfort and familiarity of their own homes. This could be going to the toilet, bathing, dressing or eating. Caregivers may help with shopping and cleaning the house if a person has limited mobility. Some caregivers will also provide emotional support and companionship, essential for people who are isolated or infirm as a result of their increasing years.

Where do they work? Caregivers are usually employed to work in the home of the patient they are caring for.

Other Useful Information
For Relatives: If your loved one has medical requirements such as a wound or a need for ongoing medication assessment but they want to remain in their own home, then you’ll need to hire a nurse to take care of them. If they just need some support with daily tasks and personal care, you can look for a caregiver. Because a caregiver doesn’t require any qualifications, they are generally cheaper to employ than a nurse.

For Job Seekers: If you want to provide companionship and practical support to elderly people, work as a caregiver could be for you. However, if you want to provide more in depth medical care, looking into nursing qualifications is a good place to start. As a nurse you’ll have greater earning potential and a wider scope of job opportunities too.

Understanding the distinction between a nurse and a caregiver is really important when setting out on a career path or finding the best available care for your loved one. Once you know which job title is of interest, do further research to ensure you make the right decision.

 

Tess Pajaron

With a background in business administration and management, Tess Pajaron currently works at Open Colleges, Australia’s leading online educator. She likes to cover stories in careers and marketing.

Healthy Perspectives: Fearful? Have a little FAITH! A Guest Post by Carol Patterson, MSN, RN

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Franklin D. Roosevelt in his 1933 inaugural address said, “The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.” This seems to be something that we probably take too lightly.  Over the years reflecting upon this quotation, it becomes increasingly meaningful.  Fear prevents us from fulfilling our potential (fear of failure is completely paralytic) and moves us away from a state of tranquility and peacefulness of mind and spirit. Consider what happens when a child sees a puddle of water on a cool autumn day. They run to it to stomp and play with carefree abandon.  As adults, we think about our feet getting wet and cold, damaging our shoes, diminishing the immune system and getting ill. So, we avoid the puddle in any way possible. Ah, now we are safe, but did we miss the joy of allowing the child within us to enjoy the moment? So, I wonder, “How healthy is that decision?” Fear robs us in many ways, which diminish are ability to live life to the fullest.

One can become a master of building fears into our everyday existence.  Years ago, someone shared the acronym for FEAR, False Evidence Appearing Real.  How often do we allow fear to become an unnecessary negative emotional drain? About a year ago, my computer system “lost” all my professional e-mail files. This sent me into a weekend long panic until I could see our campus technician. Well, that was an unfounded fear, for he quickly resolved the problem on Monday morning. But, the amount of negative emotional investment I made over this situation was enormous.  Reflecting on that weekend, I can remember all the dread I had about files that “I could not live without” causing my body and mind undue stress. By Sunday night I had considered all the ways that this permanent file loss would adversely change the course of my professional and personal life, False Evidence Appearing Real.

When we are fearful, it causes other changes not just intrapersonally but interpersonally as well. Intrapersonally fear helps us build a barrier to confine our hopes and dreams, limiting our possibilities. Our sense of self diminishes, and we lose confidence in the value of who we are and what we could become. Fear acts as a natural antagonist to hope. As we look at the origins of illnesses or recovery from illness or accidents a sense of hopefulness enables more favorable outcomes. Fears negate this positive effect of hope.  Fear also causes problems for us interpersonally. Fear can influence our behaviors, which diminishes our ability to interact effectively with others. Reflecting on the weekend described above, I know that my fears caused anger which was displaced to those around me. Fear will result in an emotional state which can negatively influences our relationships. Our first step, is to recognize the origin of the fear and then to develop a plan to neutralize unwarranted fears. As we do this we “short circuit” those negative behaviors that were caused by fear.

So, what if we develop a new acronym?  Consider, Freedom, Affirmation, Inviting change, Trust & Healing.  First, freeing myself from unnecessary fears, I must first become of aware of these unfounded fears. Identify how many times fear creeps insidiously into our minds and how it influences our decisions. We are not meant to be slaves to fear.  Acknowledging fear is the first step toward freedom. Positive affirmations need to replace our negative ones. The more we think or talk about the fear, the more powerful it becomes. These negative reflections are like throwing gasoline onto a small fire, we feed the fear and it grows. Positive affirmations extinguish the destructive fires of fear. Life gives us the opportunity to make choices about ourselves and our situations. We need to invite change. Being open to a new way of looking at a situation as an opportunity for growth, or as Phyllis Quinlan so aptly calls it, “going through boot camp”.  These challenges provide us with emotional amour to grow through difficult times and becomes stronger. Trust that we are created for something wonderful and important. There is something better coming. Watching a small rabbit during a severe storm recently, this animal took refuge under a large tree. There he quietly watched the storm and patiently waiting for it to end. This small creature showed no fear, trusting that the storm would end. We need to trust that our current circumstances will bring us to a better place where we can grow and thrive, as we have an important purpose in the universe.  Lastly, consider the healing process. Fear is future oriented, creating a scenario which invites us to fabricate all that can possible go wrong in the future. The only thing that is truly real is the here and now. Yesterday is a “done deal” and tomorrow, well that could bring anything, we have no control. But, today, right now that is where we can make things happen. To heal, focus energy on that which we can do right now. Take a small step forward.  Consider the power of a small ray of sun, concentrated over a piece of paper. Despite the narrow ray of light, when focused it can burn through that paper. Use your energy of today to keep your light shining, eradicate those fearful dark places. Eliminate FEAR with FAITH.

 

 

 

Navigating Medicare – Understanding Medical Supplies vs. Durable Medical Equipment A Guest Post by Rodger Sims

Medicare

Medicare is a health insurance program that covers people who are over 65 and can cover younger people with disabilities and people suffering from kidney failure, known as end-stage renal disease (ESRD). With over 71.3 million people enrolled, Medicare is one of the largest insurance providers for seniors in the United States. If your loved ones are enrolled in Medicare, it is important to know how to navigate your options.

There are four different parts to Medicare:

Medicare Part A

Part A covers your hospital insurance. This coverage includes inpatient hospital stays, care in a nursing facility, hospital care and even some home health care. If you’ve worked over ten years and have paid into social security taxes, this coverage is free to you. In 2015, Medicare Part A had served 7.7 million patients.

Medicare Part B

Part B covers medical insurance and includes certain doctor’s services, outpatient care, medical supplies and preventative services. In 2015, Medicare Part B had served over 33.8 million seniors.

Medicare Part C

Part C is a health care plan offered by a private company that can help you with both Part A and B benefits. Known as a Medicare Advantage (MA) Plan, services offered include health maintenance organizations (HMO), preferred provider organizations (PPO), private fee-for-service plans, special needs plans and Medicare Health Savings Account (HSA) plans. Most of the Medicare Advantage Plans offer coverage for prescription drugs.

Medicare Part D

Part D of Medicare adds prescription coverage to the original Medicare, as well as to some Medicare cost plans, Medicare HSA and some private fee-for-service plans. In 2015, 38.9 million Americans utilized Part D of Medicare. Original Medicare is the tradition fee-for-service Medicare. The government pays directly for the health care services the patient receives.

Durable Medical Equipment vs. Medical Supplies

With all that in mind, it is also important to know that there are two main types of products: medical supplies and durable medical equipment (DME). Both DME and medical supplies are used to make meeting the basic needs of the elderly, ill or disabled patients at home.

Durable Medical Equipment

As suggested by the name, durable medical equipment is meant for long-term use. Medicare defines DME by the following criteria: durability, ability to be used in the home, not usually useful to someone who isn’t sick and must have a life span of three years of use. Examples of DME include hospital beds, mobility aids, prostheses (artificial limbs), orthotics (therapeutic footwear) and other supplies. Medicare pays for DME partially under Part A if the patient qualifies for home health benefit.

To qualify for home health benefit, the patient must be unable to leave his/her home, require care from a skilled nurse and does not require custodial care, such as bathing and toilet-usage. If the patient is eligible for home health benefit, Medicare will cover 80% of the allowable amount for DME.

An example of the allowable amount is the following: a patient needs a walker that costs $200. The allowable amount for the walker in that state is $100. Since Medicare will cover 80% of the allowable amount, the patient will then have to pay $120 for the walker. Under Medicare’s Part B coverage, the co-pay is the same at 20% of the allowable amount and any other additional expense after that.

For Medicare Part B, the patient does not need to qualify for home health benefit to be eligible for coverage. If a doctor or medical professional considers the product medically necessary, Medicare will partially reimburse the patient for it. One benefit of this is the ability to rent the product being needed and still be eligible for reimbursement.

Some DME products that are not covered by Medicare include hearing aids and home adaptation items like bathroom safety and ramps. Additionally, to be reimbursed, your product supplier must be enrolled in Medicare and adhere to their guidelines. If they are not, Medicare can refuse their claims.

Make sure your providers are eligible before purchasing any products.

Medical Supplies

Medical supplies are made for short-term use. They are typically used once then thrown away. Examples of medical supplies include diabetic sugar testing strips, incontinence products (diapers, catheters, etc.) and items like bandages and protective gloves. Generally, medical supplies are not covered by Medicare, though there are a few exceptions for patients with diabetes, ostomy patients and those currently using feeding tubes. These items, however, are limited.

Ostomy products can be limited to a certain number a month. If necessary, a patient can appeal to increase the number of products received a month but must go through a process to do so. This process includes re-approval through Medicare and by a doctor.

Your Options

If you can provide insurance for your loved ones and cost isn’t a large factor, it is useful to know that Medicare can be paired up with other private insurance companies. Doing so can help get over some of the limitations that are imposed by Medicare and ensure your senior has an overall health coverage. If this is not an option, then medical supplemental health insurance, known as Medigap, can help provide funds for expenses Medicare doesn’t cover.

To qualify for the Medigap program, you must be enrolled in both Medicare Part A and Medicare Part B. Medigap can cover excess costs, like co-insurance costs such as stays in the hospital or nursing home, and deductibles in Part A and Part B plans. Costs will vary according to coverage.

Medigap is available through private insurances or organizations that cater to the elderly.

Final Thoughts

Medicare covers durable medical equipment primarily under Part B, but also for DME for people under Part A with the home health benefit plan. Most medical supplies are not commonly covered by Medicare, and those that are covered tend to have limitations. Other options to ensure your senior has all their needs covered including pairing Medicare with a private insurance company or enrolling them in medical supplemental health insurance to help cover excess costs.

With the introduction and popularity of the internet, finding the supplies you need at the right cost is easier than ever before. Different websites offer low-cost medical supplies to help ensure the basic needs of your seniors are met. It is also easier to find the right insurance company for them with all the information available online.

For more information about Medicare and what it covers, got the Medicare website at Medicare.gov.

Images

https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/medicare-enrollment-form-glasses-398418109?src=YZoPqz-O9WK3A8VVD8TyZg-1-2

https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/empty-bed-on-hospital-ward-247358674?src=Q9ck6CAXE6czGlRyWlBoZA-1-2

https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/diabetes-test-blood-medical-equipment-506370463?src=jqL9R3jY1Q44pQysfDM6NQ-1-4

Sources:

https://www.medicare.gov/sign-up-change-plans/decide-how-to-get-medicare/whats-medicare/what-is-medicare.html

https://www.cms.gov/research-statistics-data-and-systems/statistics-trends-and-reports/cms-fast-facts/index.html 

 

Senior Tips – Best Financial Steps to Take When You Are Forced to Retire Early: A Guest Post by Alana Downer

Closeup of young woman with couple of elderly persons

Retirement confidence is at an all-time low with employees working later into their life in the hope that they don’t outlive their savings. A recent Australian report found that 51% of retirees expected to outlive their savings. Because of stats like these, people are aiming to work longer and harder to ensure a comfortable retirement, however this isn’t always the reality. A 2015 study from the Employee Benefit Research Institute found that in 2013, 47% of workers were forced to retire earlier than planned.

Forced early retirement can be more common than you might think. There are many factors which can contribute to an early retirement, among other reasons these include, job loss, loss of stamina or poor health. So, what should you do? Whether as an employee faced with early retirement, or a carer who knows someone forced into an earlier retirement? Here’s our best financial steps you should consider taking:

Assess your cash flow and income:

Your first step is to not panic! All too often people think cancelling their gym membership will help them. This small weekly or monthly fee won’t see the quality of your retirement improve drastically and going to the gym is great for your health.

Instead, what you should do is list your monthly income and expenses. Consider what benefits you can receive now that you are a retiree. Look at your health, car, life, and other insurance plans and see where you can make some savings. You may also qualify for involuntary unemployment cover. Track all your monthly expenses and know how much money you need exactly for one month. From there you can estimate how long the money you have saved will last.

Create a retirement plan:

A retirement plan is something you should be working on before you are retired, but if an early retirement has come suddenly and you find yourself without one, it’s not too late to set one in motion. You can base your plan around either retirement goals or create a cash-flow plan.

A cash-flow plan is based around investments, income and expenses, and making assumptions about inflation and how you will be able to spend throughout your retirement.

A goal based plan lets you plan major events, trips and really anything you want to achieve during your retirement. This is a good system as you can prioritise what you want to do, understand the associated costs and foresee what and how much you will be able to do.

Look for alternative ways to create income:

If you find yourself in need some extra income, or you just want to use your time to cover some expenses so you can take that retirement holiday a little sooner, there are several options you could consider.

A popular approach with some retirees is to begin trading. In recent years trading on the Forex market has become a largely successful approach to profitable trading. Of course, this takes some time to learn as there are certain strategies which must be used.

Other options include finding part time work. Maybe you love gardening, use the forced retirement as a time to pursue any careers you might be passionate about, even if they aren’t as serious as your previous full-time career.

Consult with a professional:

Retirement can be difficult to plan for, even at the best of times. Unexpected things can happen and you want to ensure you have enough money to live out your retirement comfortably and even enjoy it.

Meeting with a financial adviser can help you take specific steps towards a better retirement. They can help create budgets, suggest where to invest your money and build a financial plan that suits your specific situation.

Also think about your pension and how you want to receive it. The rate will change depending on your status, so it’s important to ensure you understand what you are eligible for.

The key to overcoming a forced early retirement and the associated financial challenges is planning. These steps are a great start to planning your retirement and can help you to achieve any retirement goals you have in mind.

 

Bio:

Alana Downer is a financial blogger and a part of the team behind Learn to Trade, a source of educational information for traders and investors. Having been always interested in achieving financial freedom, Alana might often be found sharing her strategies online with all those who wish to earn money on the side and become financially independent.

 

 

 

 

 

 

12 Dietary Choices That May Lead to Restless Sleep A Guest Post By Megan Crants

 

High Resonance Healing Words
Healer’s outstretched open hand surrounded by random wise healing words on a rustic stone effect background

Sleeping and eating are both critical elements of recovery, but not necessarily in quick succession. Many healthcare providers will encourage putting away all food at 8pm because eating causes the body to go into an arousal state and devote energy to digestion, when ideally it should be settling down for sleep. If you’re starving or hypoglycemic, a small snack is acceptable before bed to avoid mid-night awakenings, but otherwise it’s best to avoid food and drink right before lights-out. Try to plan out your eating patterns so that your last meal falls well before you fall asleep.

In fact, planning out the foods you eat throughout the entire day is not a bad idea either in terms of assuring a good night’s sleep. Certain dietary options have been linked to decreased sleep quality and can have effects on the body that last well into the night:

  1. High Fat/Fried Foods. Fatty foods stimulate digestive tract contractions, which can either cause your stomach to empty slowly, worsening constipation, or they can cause your stomach to empty rapidly, leading to diarrhea. As a result of this gastrointestinal distress, you are more likely to experience fragmented sleep.
  2. Caffeinated Beverages. Caffeine is a stimulant that causes temporary alertness by increasing adrenaline production and preventing certain sleep-inducing chemicals from taking effect. It’s best to avoid caffeine after 2pm, because it has a tendency to alter the body’s sleep/wake cycle for a long time after consumption. If you’re going to consume caffeine, we recommend drinking a shot of it before a 20-minute power nap. This strategy has been scientifically demonstrated to enhance the napping experience, since caffeine takes about 20 minutes to cause arousal.
  3. Cocoa beans naturally contain caffeine so any source of chocolate is going to harbor some form of the stimulant. Darker chocolate contains a higher percentage of cocoa beans, and therefore a higher percentage of caffeine. In addition, chocolate contains theobromine, a compound known to increase heart rate and cause arousal. To learn more, click here: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/13/health/13real.html
  4. Tyramine-Rich Foods. Foods such as aged cheeses, eggplant, soy sauce, and tomatoes contain an amino acid called tyramine. This compound causes the brain to release a stimulant called norepinephrine, which causes wakefulness.
  5. Fruits and Vegetables with a High Water Content. Celery, cucumbers, watermelons, etc. are chock-full of water and therefore natural diuretics. Waking up multiple times throughout the night with a full bladder is sure to disturb your sleep cycle, so try to avoid these foods close to bedtime.
  6. Sugary Foods. Candy, or other treats high in sugar, will likely cause spiking blood sugar levels and rapid release of insulin to control them. The spiking blood sugar levels may cause a “sugar crash” that may make it easy to fall asleep, but ultimately the fluctuations will make staying asleep a difficult task.
  7. Studies have shown that the scent of peppermint may increase alertness, decrease fatigue, and work as a central nervous system stimulant. To learn more, click here: http://www.wju.edu/about/adm_news_story.asp?iNewsID=1484&strBack=%2Fabout%2Fadm_news_archive%2Easp
  8. Sorbitol-Rich Foods. Sorbitol is an artificial sweetener that is not only added to gum and diet foods, but is also naturally found in prunes, apples, and peaches. Sorbitol commonly causes digestive problems such as gas, bloating, and diarrhea so try to avoid it when possible.
  9. Citric Fruits. Citric fruits, such as oranges, lemons, limes, and grapefruits, contain large amounts of citric acid, which can cause gastrointestinal distress and/or heartburn. In addition to the pain they cause, these ailments may also exacerbate asthma or previously existing sleep breathing disorders, such as sleep apnea.
  10. Spicy Foods. Spicy foods stimulate the digestive system, which can potentially cause gastric distress while you’re trying to sleep. Try to stick to bland foods as bedtime approaches.
  11. High Fiber Foods. Comfort is key for ideal sleeping conditions, so neans, broccoli, cauliflower, and other high fiber foods should be avoided. These dietary additions are likely to cause bloating, gas, and general discomfort which can prevent you from falling asleep or can cause you to wake up during the night.
  12. Many people believe that alcohol serves as an effective sleep aid, as it initially has a sedating effect, but it is ultimately a detriment to high quality rest. Alcohol disturbs rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, meaning that sleep quality is significantly lowered after drinking. This lack of REM sleep negatively affects daytime memory, concentration, and motor skills, not to mention mood. It can suppress breathing, triggering sleep apnea and other breathing difficulties that cause nighttime awakenings. Additionally, alcohol damages the lining of the stomach and changes liver metabolism, which can cause indigestion and other health problems that may keep you up at night.

For more information, check out our tips for high-quality sleep at https://twodreams.com/holistic-health/sleep-hygiene

Megan Crants is a staff writer at Two Dreams (www.twodreams.com) and can be reached via email at mcrants@twodreams.com.

 

Sources Cited:

http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20628881,00.html

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Wellness/16-best-worst-foods-sleep/story?id=19404975

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assisted Living Could Mean Better Quality of Life for Seniors: A Guest Post by Paul Birung

the best vision is insight phrase  on a vintage slate blackboard
the best vision is insight phrase on a vintage slate blackboard

When our parents retire, we are so busy with our jobs to care for them at home. It is tempting to put our folks in homes where they can receive round the clock care but mostly, they are against the idea. We may bend to their wishes and keep them at home but as time goes by, their needs increase and it can be quite daunting for the family.

Why Assisted Living over Home Care for Seniors?

Seniors can definitely enjoy security, contact, and support in a residential community. In such an area there is access to nutrition, wellness services, and personal care tailored to each one of them. All this is achievable without having to compromise their independence.

Assisted living is different from a nursing facility where seniors receive medical care 24/7. For example at assisted living in Hilton Head, the elderly can receive any help they need even if their family is far away. These are the reasons you should think about assisted living for the sake of your loved ones’ quality of life.

  1. Opportunities for Physical Fitness

As assisted living communities there are group exercises, top notch gym facilities and personal trainers who do more than a caregiver would at home.

  1. Chances of Social Contact

It can be quite lonesome for a senior lying alone at home where they cannot reach their friends. Assisted Living offers common areas, planned trips, and activities that make it inevitable for seniors to socialize with peers.

  1. Safety

You must senior-proof and make modifications at home to make sure that your loved ones are safe. Such changes are definitely expensive and needs keep adding up as physical health wanes. Assisted living centers are designed for the seniors with keen attention to mobility, avoiding accidents and accessibility.

  1. Monitored Nutrition

Family members may not be able to keep up the nutrition demands of seniors who may not be able to make their own meals. There are chances of better nutrition in an assisted living facility where meals are prepared according to each resident’s needs.

  1. Help with Daily Activities

Bathing, dressing or feeding a loved on may be stressful for family members. With assisted living, residents get help with these activities. This is one of the basic offerings for assisted living and it, therefore, saves families the cost of a homecare assistant. This way, older adults can keep their independence.

  1. Housekeeping

The task of caring for seniors at home leaves families with extra chores to do. It isn’t easy to keep the house clean, weed the garden or cook with a senior in need of care. When these adults reside in assisted living, this burden is relieved so family members have more time to focus on themselves.

  1. Transportation

The facility will be responsible for residents’ transportation needs to the hospital, social engagements, and other appointments. With this taken care of, family members can enjoy more free time on their daily activities.

Assisted living certainly offers more independence to the seniors and their families. By giving each individual a chance to live life to the fullest, assisted living ensure that families stay happy, and this is the hallmark of quality living.